Daily Footprint, #35 – Tofurky

Packaging for the Tofurky veggie roast with wild rice stuffing

Tofurky (made by the charmingly-named Turtle Island Foods, based in Portland, Oregon) has been around since the 1980s and is still a family-owned company. Founder, Seth Tibbot had this to say about the journey: Armed with my life savings of $2500 and a passionate love for soybeans, I rented a small space in the back … Continue reading Daily Footprint, #35 – Tofurky

Daily Footprint, #34 – Tofu

Two soybean (soya bean) pods hanging from a plant in a field.

I was going to cover a specific soy-based product for this fourth post on meat-alternatives. However, I think it’s best to cover soy in general as the topic requires a post to itself. So, as a proxy for soy, I’m going to cover the most common meat-substitute in the world: tofu! A note about terminology: … Continue reading Daily Footprint, #34 – Tofu

Daily Footprint, #33 – No Evil

A package of "The Stallion" sausages from No Evil Foods, composed of cardboard.

Continuing on the theme on meat alternatives, I’m going to take a look at No Evil Foods, which began in 2014 by selling homemade products in farmers’ markets in North Carolina and has grown since then, recently expanding to Whole Foods markets across the US. They make a range of high-protein products to cook with … Continue reading Daily Footprint, #33 – No Evil

Daily Footprint, #32 – Quorn

Two packages (the UK and US versions) of the new vegan spicy burger patties available from Quorn.

Hey folks! I’m continuing to look at the social and environmental impact of meat-alternatives; last time it was a newcomer, Beyond Meat, and now I’m going to take a look at one of the originals: Quorn. Since the 1960’s there has been a lot of interest in the idea of reducing our dependence on meat … Continue reading Daily Footprint, #32 – Quorn

Daily Footprint, #31 – Beyond Meat

A package of four Beyond Meat sausages (hot Italian variety)

Hi Folks! In a return to the Daily Footprint posts, I’m going to spend some time looking at plant-based meat substitutes. They are definitely catching on: last year, in the US, sales of meat rose by 2% while sales of plant-based meat-substitutes rose by 24% (and sales rose even faster than that in Europe). Over … Continue reading Daily Footprint, #31 – Beyond Meat

The Problem with Loop

A cartoon showing the process of ordering items from Loop online, receiving them in a reusable tote package, then returning the package to Loop for cleaning and refilling to be shipped to another customer.

Tom Szaky, founder of Terracycle, is about to launch a new enterprise called Loop that aims to tackle the problem of packaging waste by delivering products in reusable containers. How important is packaging in ethics? Packaging is usually one of the factors to consider when deciding on an ethical (Green Stars) rating for a product. … Continue reading The Problem with Loop

Daily Footprint, #30 – Sustainable and Ethical Cat Litter

Walnut shells are shown next to Naturally Fresh brand of cat litter while a bentonite clay strip mine is shown next to Ever Clean litter.

Hi folks! I’m going to take a look at the social and environmental impact of cat litter, which provides a good example of why we need user-generated reviews. I think that most people want to make ethical choices, but researching the sustainability of something like kitty litter never quite becomes a priority. Green stars reviews … Continue reading Daily Footprint, #30 – Sustainable and Ethical Cat Litter

Daily Footprint, #29 – Refrigeration

Four -80 degree freezers that use sustainable refrigerants

Project Drawdown brought together experts in several fields to come up with a ranked list of solutions to climate change and, somewhat surprisingly, refrigerant management was #1 on that list. This applies mostly to air conditioning (AC) units and any form of freezer/refrigerator. Starting in 1989, under the Montreal Protocol to reverse damage to the … Continue reading Daily Footprint, #29 – Refrigeration

Are Kind bars socially responsible?

A Kind bar: dark chocolate, nuts and sea salt variety.

Back in 2014, Fortune magazine wrote an article, Why Kind bars are suddenly everywhere, which opened with this paragraph: Kind Healthy Snacks’ founder Daniel Lubetzky had a modest ambition when he started the company in 2004. The son of a Holocaust survivor, Lubetzky says he wanted to bring more kindness to the world in the … Continue reading Are Kind bars socially responsible?