Ethical review of the Grocery Outlet

Ethical Review of the Grocery Outlet. Items purchased recently, including plant-based milk from Oatley, Ripple, and Hope & Sesame; marcona almonds and spouted pumpkin seeds, vegan mozzarella and cheese spread from Miyoko's, and chocolate from Tony's Chocolonely and OCHO.

The Grocery Outlet is a supermarket based mainly on the west coast of the US that specializes in food and wine bargains. It started off in San Francisco when, back in 1946, James Read sold food at a discount that he had purchased from government surplus supplies. The idea is still the same – the … Continue reading Ethical review of the Grocery Outlet

Ethical vegan shoes from Etiko

Etiko high tops canvas shoes, shown from two angles. They resemble Converse high tops but are more ethcial in that they are made in a fair trade factory from organic, fair trade cotton and FSC-certified natural rubber

In this post I’m going to do an ethical review of shoes from an Australian brand, Etiko, and decide on an ethical (Green Stars) rating. Since turning vegetarian at 15, I’d relied quite a bit on Converse High Tops as my go-to leather-free shoes. Converse used to make shoes in the US but eventually went … Continue reading Ethical vegan shoes from Etiko

Dean Foods bankruptcy and ethical consumerism

Images of Dairy Pure milk from Dean Foods and plant-based milk from Ripple Foods. Underneath is a graphic showing the ethical rating for these products: 1/5 and 4.5/5 Green Stars, respectively.

Dean Foods, the largest dairy company in the US, filed for bankruptcy this week. Sad news for employees, but perhaps a positive indicator for ethical consumerism. Is the myth of the ethical consumer becoming a reality? (The myth of the ethical consumer refers to the idea that, while many of us prioritize ethical choices in … Continue reading Dean Foods bankruptcy and ethical consumerism

Daily Footprint, #35 – Tofurky

Packaging for the Tofurky veggie roast with wild rice stuffing

Tofurky (made by the charmingly-named Turtle Island Foods, based in Portland, Oregon) has been around since the 1980s and is still a family-owned company. Founder, Seth Tibbot had this to say about the journey: Armed with my life savings of $2500 and a passionate love for soybeans, I rented a small space in the back … Continue reading Daily Footprint, #35 – Tofurky

Daily Footprint, #34 – Tofu

Two soybean (soya bean) pods hanging from a plant in a field.

I was going to cover a specific soy-based product for this fourth post on meat-alternatives. However, I think it’s best to cover soy in general as the topic requires a post to itself. So, as a proxy for soy, I’m going to cover the most common meat-substitute in the world: tofu! A note about terminology: … Continue reading Daily Footprint, #34 – Tofu

Daily Footprint, #33 – No Evil

A package of "The Stallion" sausages from No Evil Foods, composed of cardboard.

Continuing on the theme on meat alternatives, I’m going to take a look at No Evil Foods, which began in 2014 by selling homemade products in farmers’ markets in North Carolina and has grown since then, recently expanding to Whole Foods markets across the US. They make a range of high-protein products to cook with … Continue reading Daily Footprint, #33 – No Evil

Daily Footprint, #32 – Quorn

Two packages (the UK and US versions) of the new vegan spicy burger patties available from Quorn.

Hey folks! I’m continuing to look at the social and environmental impact of meat-alternatives; last time it was a newcomer, Beyond Meat, and now I’m going to take a look at one of the originals: Quorn. Since the 1960’s there has been a lot of interest in the idea of reducing our dependence on meat … Continue reading Daily Footprint, #32 – Quorn

Daily Footprint, #31 – Beyond Meat

A package of four Beyond Meat sausages (hot Italian variety)

Hi Folks! In a return to the Daily Footprint posts, I’m going to spend some time looking at plant-based meat substitutes. They are definitely catching on: last year, in the US, sales of meat rose by 2% while sales of plant-based meat-substitutes rose by 24% (and sales rose even faster than that in Europe). Over … Continue reading Daily Footprint, #31 – Beyond Meat

The Problem with Loop

A cartoon showing the process of ordering items from Loop online, receiving them in a reusable tote package, then returning the package to Loop for cleaning and refilling to be shipped to another customer.

Tom Szaky, founder of Terracycle, is about to launch a new enterprise called Loop that aims to tackle the problem of packaging waste by delivering products in reusable containers. How important is packaging in ethics? Packaging is usually one of the factors to consider when deciding on an ethical (Green Stars) rating for a product. … Continue reading The Problem with Loop